Dinner with Socrates, No. 9 ~ Conservationists of Custom

Reading: “Ten Conservative Principles” by Russell Kirk (excerpt) Overview: Russell Kirk helped define the very meaning of conservatism as an author, essayist, and critic.  In a speech he delivered in 1986 he articulated ten principles of the conservative, though, he preceded the list with the claim that conservatism isn’t so …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 8 ~ Herd Much?

Reading: “Live Not by Lies” Alexander Solzhenitsyn Overview: I was brought to this essay by Solzhenitsyn by way of the essay ofPatrick Deneen at First Things as commented upon by Rod Dreher at the American Conservative, both written in response to the recent imposition of “gay marriage” upon the land in the Obergefell v. Hodges …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 7 ~ What is Dogma For?

Reading: “Dogma: What is it?” by James V. Schall, S. J. Overview: Father Schall is a contemporary, Catholic, political philosopher who is well known for his popular essays.  These often appear in journals like Crisis, The Catholic Thing, and The Imaginative Conservative (all worth reading for their other authors, as well).  He is a Jesuit, …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 6 ~ What is Death?

Reading:  Hamlet by William Shakespeare Overview: Shakespeare needs little introduction.  “The Bard,” as we sometimes call him, stands at the fore of the first rank of writers of drama and poetry in English, at least.   It is difficult to compare literature from different languages without a deep fluency in the languages …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 4 ~ Is Your Imagination Fantastic?

Reading:  “The Fantastic Imagination” by George MacDonald Overview: Many of us are introduced to George MacDonald by C. S. Lewis, who found in him a spiritual teacher, as well as, in considering his literary achievements, a master myth maker.  For more on just what Lewis says of MacDonald you should …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 3 ~ What’s Your Purpose, Kid?

Reading:  The Aesop for Children, with Pictures by Milo Winters Rand McNally, 1919. Overview: Like Homer, very little is known about Aesop.  The historian Herodotus mentions that “Aesop the fable-writer” was a slave of a Samian, who was supposed to have won his freedom and taken up a position as adviser …

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Dinner with Socrates, No. 1 ~ Cultural Collapse

Reading: Christopher Dawson, “Christianity as the Soul of the West” Overview: Culturally, we seem to be standing on a precipice.  One more step and the West will tumble down into moral oblivion.  Modernity has been rapidly stripping away its Christian foundation, attempting to create something that it perceives to be better.  …

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